Using Sudo for Super User Access to Root Privileges in Linux

The Linux super user, or root user, is a special user that has tremendous power, with the ability to access and modify all files on the operating system. This is necessary at times, but there is a potential for accidental errors to cause a great deal of destruction, so you have to be careful. (Like Spiderman says, with great power comes great responsibility.) Fot the times when the super user’s power is necessary, we’ll look at safer ways to be the super user on your Linux dedicated server. Super User and Sudo A really important feature of Linux is privileges. It’s part of the security, and controls which users can access, manipulate or even be aware of what files. Logged in with the user account we’ve created will allow safe usage of the operating system, but there are times when the privileges of the root, or super user are required. There are two ways to access super user privileges. The first is with the su command. $ su – If you enter this command, and note the hyphen, then you will be prompted for the root user’s password. Enter it correctly, and you will be logged in as the super user. You can then perform what tasks you need to, but with care! When you’ve finished, log out immediately using the exit command. The second way to get super user privileges is to use sudo. This is a method by which a regular user can gain a temporary privilege boost. It takes a little setting up, but once done it is probably safer than the su command method. First,...

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