Guide to the Intel Core 2 Quad and Extreme processors

In November 2006 Intel released the first in their range of Intel Core 2 Quad processors. Codenamed the ‘Kentsfield’, the newly released processors were two Core 2 Duo chips connected by a 1066 MHz FSB all continued on one multi-chip module. The series number for the more powerful Core 2 Extreme (‘Kentsfield XE’) was Qx6xx0, while the Core 2 Quad (‘Kentsfield’) was given the Q6xx0 code. There have been five releases of differing versions of the processor, all designed for use on desktop systems. First released was the Core 2 Extreme Qx6700 – two E6700 chips packaged on one socket. Like its Core 2 Duo predecessors, the Core 2 Extreme Quad was presented on the LGA775 platform and used Intel’s 65nm fabrication (meaning it was backwards compatible and would easily integrate with existing systems). The E6700 utilized 143mm2 dice each with 291 million transistors and each carrying 4mb DDR2-800 L2 cache. This cache memory is shared between the two dual core components meaning a total of up to 8mb shared cache. The clock speed of the combined chips matched the 2.67 GHz clock frequency of its parent. Intel had developed the preceding Core 2 Duo chips with power consumption and heat output in mind (undoubtedly mindful of the problems that beset the later Pentium models). The Core 2 Quad range was able to utilize all the advantages and manufacturing improvements introduced in these earlier models. Requiring only 1.34 volts to power the pair of processors results in much lower heat output than would perhaps traditionally have been the case: their TDP of 130 watts matched that of the later...

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