DDR SDRAM explained

Double Data Rate DDR) SDRAM is the other competing memory technology battling to provide system builders with a high-performance alternative to Direct RDRAM. As in standard SDRAM, DDR SDRAM is tied to the system’s FSB, the memory and bus executing instructions at the same time rather than one of them having to wait for the other. Traditionally, to synchronise logic devices, data transfers would occur on a clock edge. As a clock pulse oscillates between 1 and 0, data would be output on either the rising edge (as the pulse changes from a 0 to a 1) or on the falling edge. DDR DRAM works by allowing the activation of output operations on the chip to occur on both the rising and falling edge of the clock, thereby providing an effective doubling of the clock frequency without increasing the actual frequency. DDR-DRAM first broke into the mainstream PC arena in late 1999, when it emerged as the memory technology of choice on graphics cards using nVidia’s GeForce 256 3D graphics chip. Lack of support from Intel delayed its acceptance as a main memory technology. Indeed, when it did begin to be used as PC main memory, it was no thanks to Intel. This was late in 2000 when AMD rounded off what had been an excellent year for the company by introducing DDR-DRAM to the Socket A motherboard. While Intel appeared happy for the Pentium III to remain stuck in the world of PC133 SDRAM and expensive RDRAM, rival chipset maker VIA wasn’t, coming to the rescue with the DDR-DRAM supporting Pro266 chipset. By early 2001, DDR-DRAM’s prospects had...

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