Intel Centrino mobile computer platform

The first generation Centrino platform (codenamed Montara) was announced in March 2003. The trio of systems that comprise Centrino focus on battery life and the integration of wireless LAN technology. Only systems that include all three components: a Pentium-M processor the Intel 855 chipset family an Intel Pro/Wireless LAN adapter. are allowed to use the Centrino brand. The Intel Pentium-M processor – previously codenamed Banias – should not to be confused with the earlier Pentium 4-M. Manufactured on Intel’s 0.13-micron process technology and with a die size of 100mm2, the new CPU combines some of the best features of earlier designs to produce a new microarchitecture capable of delivering high performance with reduced power consumption. Like the Pentium III-M, the Pentium-M adopts the same design principal of performing more processor instructions per tick of the system clock. It does this without generating too much heat and can run at low voltages. In addition, it also supports the Pentium 4-M’s quad-pumped 400MHz FSB and support for both vSIMD and SIMD2 instructions to further boost performance. Since power consumption is directly proportional to clock speed, it is not surprising that a Pentium-M runs at lower clock than a Pentium 4-M, the new CPU being initially available is speeds from 1.3GHz to 1.6GHz. At the time of its launch, Intel claimed that a 1.6GHz Pentium-M offered comparable performance to a 2.4GHz Pentium 4-M at 50% less battery drain. In addition to the new core, the processor’s Level 1 cache has been increased to 32KB from the Pentium III-M’s 16KB and the Level 2 cache is a full 1MB. However, to reduce power...

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