Installing a SCSI device – making the connections

Squeeze either side of the connector to connect the supplied SCSI cable to the SCSI host adapter card’s external SCSI connector. Connect the other end to the scanner’s 50-pin DB50 connector … … and plug in the power adapter power cord The proliferation of SCSI standard versions over the years has led to a situation in which there exist many different types of SCSI cables and connectors. Whilst each new version of SCSI is backwards compatible, it can require a bewildering array of cables, connectors and adapters to connect together a bunch of SCSI peripherals that spans multiple variants of the standard: Host or Host Adapter Connector 50-pin Centronics: Most SCSI SLOW (5 MBps) computers and host adapters use the Centronics-type 50-pin connector. Also some 8-bit Fast computers and host adapters. DB25: Apple/Mac and some older Sun 8-bit workstations. DB50: Old Sun and DG Computers, Zip drives and many scanners. HD50: Many 8-bit SCSI FAST (up to 10 MBps) computers and host adapters use this 50-pin High-Density connector. HD68: All FAST/WIDE (16-bit) SCSI-3 computers and host adapters plus old DEC single-ended SCSI use this 68-pin High Density connector. SCA80: New Single Connector Attachment 80-pin connector used for Ultra2Wide/LVD, Ultra160 and Ultra32O applications It’s possible to connect a number of SCSI devices by creating a daisy-chain, that is, plugging one device into the next. The last device in the chain needs to terminated. In this case, since it’s going to be the only external SCSI device, the SCSI terminator the scanner was supplied should be left in place. To ensure reliable communication on the SCSI bus, the end of the...

Pin It on Pinterest