DVD-R – write once recordable DVDs

Similar in concept to CD-R, DVD-R (or, DVD-Recordable) is a write-once medium that can contain any type of information normally stored on mass produced DVD discs – video, audio, images, data files, multimedia programs, and so on. Depending on the type of information recorded, DVD-R discs are usable on virtually any compatible DVD playback device, including DVD-ROM drives and DVD Video players. An early release of DVD-R was important to the development of DVD-ROM titles since software developers needed a simple and relatively cheap way of producing test discs before going into full production. When it first appeared in the autumn of 1997 DVD-R media had a capacity of 3.95GB. This was later increased to 4.7GB of information on a single-layer, single-sided DVD-R disc. Since the DVD format supports double-sided media, up to 9.4GB can be stored on a single double-sided DVD-R disc. Data can be written to a disc at a DVD 1x equivalent to 11.08 Mbit/s, which is roughly equivalent to nine times the transfer rate of CD-ROM’s 1x speed. After recording, DVD-R discs can be read at the same rate as mass produced replicated discs, depending on the x factor of the DVD-ROM drive used. DVD-R, like CD-R, uses a constant linear velocity (CLV) rotation technique to maximise the storage density on the disc surface. This results in a variable number of revolutions per minute (RPM) as disc writing/reading progresses from one end to the other. Recording begins at the inner radius and ends at the outer. At 1x speeds, rotation of the disc varies from 1,623 to 632 RPM on 3.95GB media and 1,475 to...

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