LCD Resolution and Scaling

LCDs follow a different set of rules than CRT displays offering advantages in terms of bulk, power consumption and flicker, as well as “perfect” geometry. They have the disadvantage of a much higher price, a poorer viewing angle and less accurate colour performance. While CRTs are capable are displaying a range of resolutions and scaling them to fit the screen, an LCD panel has a fixed number of liquid crystal cells and can display only one resolution at full-screen size using one cell per pixel. Lower resolutions can be displayed by using only a proportion of the screen. For example, a 1024×768 panel can display at resolution of 640×480 by using only 66% of the screen. Most LCDs are capable of rescaling lower-resolution images to fill the screen through a process known as rathiomatic expansion. However, this works better for continuous-tone images like photographs than it does for text and images with fine detail, where it can result in badly aliased objects as jagged artefacts appear to fill in the extra pixels. The best results are achieved by LCDs that resample the screen when scaling it up, thereby anti-aliasing the image when filling in the extra pixels. Not all LCDs can do this, however. While support for multiple resolutions may not be their strong point, the ability to pivot the screen from a landscape to a portrait orientation is a feature that is particularly suited to flat panels. The technology that accomplishes this has been around since the mid-1990s and is now licensed by leading monitor and notebook manufacturers worldwide. Portrait mode is particularly appropriate for a number of...

LCD Resolutions and Picture Scaling

LCDs follow a different set of rules than CRT displays offering advantages in terms of bulk, power consumption and flicker, as well as perfect geometry. They have the disadvantage of a much higher price, a poorer viewing angle and less accurate colour performance. While CRTs are capable are displaying a range of resolutions and scaling them to fit the screen, an LCD panel has a fixed number of liquid crystal cells and can display only one resolution at full-screen size using one cell per pixel. Lower resolutions can be displayed by using only a proportion of the screen. For example, a 1024×768 panel can display at resolution of 640×480 by using only 66% of the screen. Most LCDs are capable of rescaling lower-resolution images to fill the screen through a process known as rathiomatic expansion. However, this works better for continuous-tone images like photographs than it does for text and images with fine detail, where it can result in badly aliased objects as jagged artefacts appear to fill in the extra pixels. The best results are achieved by LCDs that resample the screen when scaling it up, thereby anti-aliasing the image when filling in the extra pixels. Not all LCDs can do this, however. While support for multiple resolutions may not be their strong point, the ability to pivot the screen from a landscape to a portrait orientation is a feature that is particularly suited to flat panels. The technology that accomplishes this has been around since the mid-1990s and is now licensed by leading monitor and notebook manufacturers worldwide. Portrait mode is particularly appropriate for a number of...

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